History

As one of Melbourne’s oldest and most prestigious suburbs, Brighton has seen many waves of subdivision and development over the last hundred years. At the start of the post-war era, it established itself as a minor but still important epicentre for mid-century modernism. The hitherto undeveloped Brighton East area quickly became a local focus for early post-war residential settlement, with several notable Melbourne architects building houses for themselves in the new modernist style. By the early 1950s, the sway of modern architecture was being felt right across Brighton, and by the turn of the decade, innovative new residential buildings had made a significant impact on the suburban landscape. Brighton’s developing reputation as an epicentre for fine modern residences reached a peak in the late 1960s and early ‘70s, when several local examples won major architectural awards. Heavily influenced by Frank Lloyd Wright, these residences demonstrated the increasingly inclusive nature of modern architecture at that time. Today, Brighton’s architecture retains its pure modernist character while carefully considering the natural world.

ONE OF MELBOURNE’S OLDEST
AND MOST PRESTIGIOUS SUBURBS,
BRIGHTON HAS ESTABLISHED
ITSELF AS AN EPICENTRE FOR
MID-CENTURY MODERNISM.

ONE OF MELBOURNE’S OLDEST AND MOST PRESTIGIOUS SUBURBS, BRIGHTON HAS ESTABLISHED ITSELF AS AN EPICENTRE FOR MID-CENTURY MODERNISM.

Process

Fearon Hay had delivered projects in New York, Sydney, San Francisco and Sri Lanka before, but never Melbourne. Although Jeff Fearon was initially dubious as the practice rarely works on apartment buildings, he was won over by the architectural potential of the project.

Given complete creative freedom, Fearon Hay considered a number of factors in conceptualizing the character of Lindsay. Prime amongst these was the optimum use of light in each apartment and the creation of a spatial layout that enabled seamless movement. Architecturally speaking, the generous dimensions of the site provided both the biggest joy and the biggest challenge in the design process.

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Inspiration

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Light is what gives space its luminance and energy. It defines its composition and determines its character. The arrangement and quality of light in a building is ultimately what influences how a space is occupied, as well as how it looks. Without light, nothing can be seen, supposed or sustained. Without light, there is no architecture.

Developed by JacMax

Architecture by Fearon Hay

Landscape Architecture by Eckersley